'20 years of impact of the Palermo Protocol: Contestations and Reflections'

Jaffer Latief Najar

The Palermo Protocol is supposed to help victims of human trafficking. In this article, PhD researcher Jaffer Latief Najar asks whether this is indeed the case.

Published in Global Policy and part of a forthcoming ebook, Jaffer Latief Najar highlights how current dominant global anti-trafficking approaches, including UN Palermo Protocol, further epistemic violence and enables further disenfranchisement of targeted groups.

He  highlights the discontent with anti-trafficking programmes, common among the supposed beneficiaries who have been growing increasingly frustrated with India's policies around sex work, expressly since 2011, the year in which India ratified the United Nations’ Palermo Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (later referred to as the Palermo Protocol).

On the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Palermo Protocol he takes the opportunity to consider the remaining contestations, review the impact on targeted populations, and assess the path forward. 

Read the full article online - '20 years of impact of the Palermo Protocol: Contestations and Reflections'

PhD student