Disaster governance in conflict settings

Researchers working on the When Disaster Meets Conflict research project have published 2 articles in the journal Politics and Governance

'Disaster Governance in Conflict-Affected Authoritarian Contexts: The Cases of Ethiopia, Myanmar, and Zimbabwe'

Authored by Dr Isabelle Desportes and Professor Thea Hilhorst, this article offers a middle-ground scenario-based approach, focusing on disaster governance in authoritarian contexts experiencing low-intensity conflict. It explores the politics of disaster response by asking what is at stake and what happened, unpacking these questions for state, civil society, and international humanitarian actors.

Read the article online'Disaster Governance in Conflict-Affected Authoritarian Contexts: The Cases of Ethiopia, Myanmar, and Zimbabwe'

'The Politics of the Multi-Local in Disaster Governance'

This article by Samantha Melis and Professor Raymond Apthorpe questions the concept of 'localization', asking What is ‘the local’? How does localization work in practice? The authors aim to build a foundation for the understanding of connotative, nuanced ‘locals’ and to explore the multiple dimensions of the local in both theory and practice.

Read the article online - 'The Politics of the Multi-Local in Disaster Governance'

Researcher

Dr Isabelle Desportes

Professor

Professor Thea Hilhorst

PhD student

Samantha Melis

Professor

Professor Raymond Apthorpe

More information

When Disaster Meets Conflict (Discord) studies the nexus between humanitarian aid and disaster governance. It analyses how state, non-state and humanitarian actors respond to disasters in three conflict settings: low-medium, high, and post-conflict.

The project aims to learn about the challenges, experiences, best practices and success factors for aid in each of the three settings. It also seeks to understand how the politicization of disaster response affects the legitimacy, power and relations between governance actors.